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MEDIA RELEASE

Strong growth in ICT workforce

MEDIA STATEMENT

February 18, 2014: The Australian Computer Society (ACS) 2013 Statistical Compendium has revealed growth in the ICT workforce of almost 10 per cent over 2012, signalling the strength of ICT sales, operations and trade occupations. The good news for ICT continues with a slight increase in domestic university completions, which had seen a 55 per cent fall since 2003.

The contribution to GDP by ICT was also measured at 6.9%, confirming the crucial role the digital economy plays in maintaining and creating local economic opportunity. This was further supported by an increase in both Research & Development and overall revenue in the industry.

ACS President Brenda Aynsley OAM welcomed the outcomes.

"It's pleasing to see the ICT profession continuing to contribute so meaningfully to the economy. The ubiquitous nature of technology means these figures will only continue to creep upwards as more industries come to rely on ICT professionals in order to gain a competitive edge.'

Brenda highlighted the improvement in students completing university qualifications in ICT.

"The 55 per cent decline seen in the previous decade remains incredibly alarming. We need to develop a highly educated, appropriately skilled workforce to secure the economic future in Australia. Seeing an upward trend now in both domestic enrolment and completion will help promote technology education as a pathway of choice. As the digital economy continues to grow, having a technological qualification is becoming more valuable to employers and job seekers alike."

The report also identified that over 28 per cent of the total ICT workforce is now female. Ms Aynsley welcomed this, but called for more participation.

"It's fantastic to see that almost 1 in 3 ICT management and operations employees are females, but the number falls below 1 in 5 when we look at technical and professional occupations. As a nation we need to provide more opportunity and support to women looking to enter ICT and we will continue to build on our strong record of encouraging women in the profession.' The full compendium can be found by clicking here

Further information

Thomas Shanahan, Australian Computer Society, 0449 902 130

 

MEDIA RELEASE

Report reveals continued strong growth in ICT workforce

Media Release 

February 18, 2014: The Australian Computer Society (ACS) 2013 Statistical Compendium has revealed growth in the ICT workforce of almost 10 per cent over 2012, signalling the strength of ICT sales, operations and trade occupations. The good news for ICT continues with a slight increase in domestic university completions, which had seen a 55 per cent fall since 2003.

The contribution to GDP by ICT was also measured at 6.9%, confirming the crucial role the digital economy plays in maintaining and creating local economic opportunity. This was further supported by an increase in both Research & Development and overall revenue in the industry.

ACS President Brenda Aynsley OAM welcomed the outcomes.

"It's pleasing to see the ICT profession continuing to contribute so meaningfully to the economy. The ubiquitous nature of technology means these figures will only continue to creep upwards as more industries come to rely on ICT professionals in order to gain a competitive edge.'

Brenda highlighted the improvement in students completing university qualifications in ICT.

"The 55 per cent decline seen in the previous decade remains incredibly alarming. We need to develop a highly educated, appropriately skilled workforce to secure the economic future in Australia. Seeing an upward trend now in both domestic enrolment and completion will help promote technology education as a pathway of choice. As the digital economy continues to grow, having a technological qualification is becoming more valuable to employers and job seekers alike."

The report also identified that over 28 per cent of the total ICT workforce is now female. Ms Aynsley welcomed this, but called for more participation.

"It's fantastic to see that almost 1 in 3 ICT management and operations employees are females, but the number falls below 1 in 5 when we look at technical and professional occupations. As a nation we need to provide more opportunity and support to women looking to enter ICT and we will continue to build on our strong record of encouraging women in the profession.' The full compendium can be found by clicking here

Further information

Thomas Shanahan, Australian Computer Society, 0449 902 130

Thomas.shanahan@acs.org.au