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ACS Week In Review: 6 December 2013

Friday, 06 Dec 2013

ACS Future Leader’s Institute registrations filling up quickly

The Inaugural ACS Future Leader’s Institute will help develop courageous CIO’s who can lead Australia’s digital economy into the future. It will be held in Kingscliff NSW, February 3-7, 2014.

Being a courageous CIO requires a unique combination of entrepreneurial flair and strong analytical skills. It means you’re able to recognise the competitive advantages that a particular technology can brings to an organisation and its customers, and effectively drive change. And it means you have the confidence to face the challenges of disruptive technologies that arrive in ever-shorter cycles.

If that sounds like you, then you cannot afford to miss this opportunity. The ACS Future Leaders Institute is your chance to develop the leadership skills that help you realise your full potential as a CIO, with the ability to recognise and implement the next game-changing solution successfully and respond decisively to disruptive technology.

Click here to register today

27 international volunteer roles available in 2014

IT graduates and professionals are being given a once in a lifetime opportunity to develop their skills and give something back to the global community with volunteer roles facilitated by Australian Volunteers for International Development (AVID) and Australian Youth Ambassadors for Development (AYAD) now open to applicants.

IT assignments are on a contract basis, ranging from 3-12 months in duration (the majority being three-month contracts). There will be roles available as Desktop Support Officers, Technical Support Officers, Software Developers, Network Administrators, Website Developers, Database Administrators and IT Advisors.

Successful applicants will receive return airfares, in-country support, comprehensive insurances, living & accommodation allowances, medicals, vaccinations, training, visas and much more.

If you would like to apply and take part in what could be a life changing experience, visit www.ayad.com.au/IT or www.volunteering.austraining.com.au/IT to find out more.

Submission into Commonwealth Procurement

We would be interested to hear from members who are ICT suppliers of goods and services to the commonwealth. There is an opportunity to make submission to the Senate Inquiry into Government Procurement. The Inquiry is to consider the current ratio of Australian goods and services versus imported goods and services utilised by the Commonwealth through its policies and procurement procedures. Further information is available from the following link. Interested members can contact policy@acs.org.au

Are you thinking like a CIO? Take our poll today

100 CIOs participated in the ACS 2013 employment survey. Respondents were asked to nominate the top four skills they use in their current role using skills defined in the Skills Framework for the Information Age (SFIA).

We’re now running a poll to see what you think the 100 CIO’s selected. The poll will remain open until December 13, and can be accessed by clicking the link above.

Pay up or your data dies: ransomware hits Australia

DEVASTATING malware that makes users' computer files unreadable until they pay a hefty ransom has begun infiltrating Australian computers after wreaking havoc in Britain and the US.

The so-called "ransomware", known as CryptoLocker, silently encrypts files on Windows computers, along with files on any connected network storage or USB devices, rendering them unreadable.

Once the encryption process finishes, it tells users to pay a ransom, which so far has been $100, $300 or two bitcoins, currently worth about $2400.

Users become infected when they open email attachments from what appear legitimate sources such as delivery firm FedEX and anti-virus providers Symantec and McAfee. CryptoLocker also can piggyback its way into your computer via other malware.

Adelaide Uni on hiring blitz for tech transformation

Under the guidance of its first ever CIO, the University of Adelaide is boosting its internal IT headcount by almost half to shore up the ranks ahead of a wide-ranging and long-running technology transformation program.

The university recently embarked on a hiring blitz which — over the next year — will see its technology services division grow from 125 internal staff to 185, with the potential for a further 20 to be added in 2015. As a result, contracted staff will decrease from around 50 to 20.

The growth in permanent headcount is made possible by the university pouring an additional $75 million into technology over the next five years, on top of existing spend. 

The project list is lengthy. Alongside investment in online course tools, research administration and improvements to student-facing administration systems, the university will take on a new CRM system and overhaul business intelligence, among other initiatives.