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ACS Week In Review: 8 November 2013

Friday, 08 Nov 2013

ACS WA Branch Conference: ICT and the Analytics Future – Leaders, Learners and Laggards

The ACS in WA annually hosts the state conference to help ensure the professional development of its members. This year, the half-day conference aims to incorporate a networking event to encourage delegates to network amongst peers and discuss the day's proceedings.

The conference will be held on November 12, 2013 and you can register and find out more information at http://www.acs.org.au/branches/western-australia/acs-wa-conference-2013

ACS praises decision to scrap self-education cap

The Australian Computer Society (ACS) has backed a decision by the Coalition government to scarp the limit on claiming tax deductions for self-education expenses.

The $2000 cap, introduced by the former Treasurer, Labor's Wayne Swan, was originally to take effect from 1 July next year but then deferred until 2015. The measure was intended to raise $266.7 million dollars, Treasurer Joe Hockey said this morning.

Hockey's comments on scrapping the cap were made as part of the federal government's announcement that it would ditch or alter more than 90 proposed changes to tax and superannuation.

Program to attract young ICT talent goes national

A program aimed at attracting and retaining young talent within the ICT industry will be rolled out on a national scale following the appointment of Karsten Schulz as national manager.

Called GroupX, the collaborative initiative features representatives from the Australian Information Industry Association, Australian Computer Society and professionals across education and government sectors. It will be funded through the government’s Digital Careers Program.

This year, GroupX made 60 school visits and events involving 165 schools and 40,000 students across Queensland, NSW, ACT and Victoria. It will be working alongside numerous industry and university collaborators to promote a range of programs including RoboCup, Club KidPreneur, SAP Young ICT Explorers and the National Computer Science Summer School.

Start-ups need more than accelerators to grow up

He's optmistic about Australian start-ups, but seasoned entrepreneur Jonathan Barouch says we are a long way from having adequate funding to foster the ideas and companies springing up locally.

Telstra's launch last month of the muru-D shared workspace and accelerator program for start-ups is another encouraging sign for Australian tech innovators. And it is good news for the broader information and communications technology (ICT) sector in this country.

Corporate sector interest in the emerging start-up community brings with it credibility. The more credibility the sector gathers, the more ideas and entrepreneurs it will attract. It also gives entrepreneurs a path to commercialisation by either leveraging the large procurement pool for the technology services of these companies or in Telstra's competitor's Singtel model, opening up distribution opportunities across the region.