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ACS Week In Review: 23 August 2013

Friday, 23 Aug 2013

The ACS is seeking feedback to the Australian Cloud Protocol discussion paper available here http://acs.org.au/information-resources/public-policy/2013-australian-cloud-protocol

You can also attend Cloud Protocol Workshops in Sydney, Brisbane and Canberra. These discussions will be facilitated by the ACS and will encourage frank and open consideration of the 8 questions raised in the discussion paper. Representatives from the DBCDE and the ACS Cloud Special Interest Groups will also be in attendance to answer your questions. Submissions close on September 5.

Brisbane – September 4 – Register Here

Sydney – August 30 – Register Here

Canberra – September 5 – Register Here

Protect Your Future!

The ACS is also demonstrating our commitment to our members in the SME space by running a series of risk mitigation workshops in partnership with Chubb and OAMPS. These events will highlight significant risks to SME’s using real world examples and will offer solutions to some of the more common risks faced in today’s business environment. Registration is open now with events being held throughout Australia in late August. Click here for more information.

Election hinders tech hiring

IT recruitment has softened since a election was announced at the start of the year and would not pick up until a result was known, hirers say.

The country’s largest IT&T recruitment company, Peoplebank, found the announcement of an election by former Prime Minister Julia Gillard had impacted clients’ IT investment and their hiring this year.

"We literally started to see things come off shortly after that (January 30) announcement,’’ Peoplebank chief executive officer Peter Acheson said.

But the drop-off in hiring confidence would create a period of latent demand following the September 7 election, he said.

"Once we get the election out of the way, and provided there is a government with a majority, we will see a spike in hiring, probably as soon as November."

Internet sales climb 25%: ABS

The value of online trading by Australian businesses is estimated to have reached $237 billion in 2011-12 according to an annual survey run by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

The ABS has mapped a steady increase in online revenue in past years.

The 2011-12 figure represents a 25 percent increase on the 2010-11, when $189 billion worth of internet sales was recorded.

More than 28 percent of companies responding to the ABS ‘business use of IT’ survey indicated that they received orders via the internet in some manner, the same proportion as the previous year, suggesting that volumes are increasing.

The most popular method of receiving online orders was email, with 66 percent of all businesses saying they traded via email at some point in the financial year.

Corruption watchdog releases tips on IT contractors

The NSW Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC) has published a paper for government agencies to help minimise the corruption risks involved in managing IT contractors.

The release of the paper on Wednesday follows the case of an IT manager at the University of Sydney, Atilla "Todd" Demiralay, who last year was found corrupt by ICAC for giving jobs to his mates and awarding $1.6 million worth of IT contracts to a company he part-owned.

ICAC said it released the paper to "provide insight into the diverse range of strategies used by organisations to minimise corruption and opportunistic behaviour while achieving their IT goals".

"For public sector managers, the oversight of IT projects and engagement of IT contractors is fraught with risks of delays, cost blowouts and failure to achieve project goals," the paper says. "The rapidly evolving IT field renders impractical many attempts to directly manage the technical aspects of IT projects – a problem heightened for managers with core expertise that is remote from IT."

Is Moko Australia’s own next Facebook?

Its origins go back to a five-person operation above a hairdresser in Perth. Now reincarnated social network company Moko is gearing up to crack the US college scene and a $US1 billion capitalisation on the world's biggest technology stock exchange.

Next month, the Western Australia company will launch a service to connect advertisers with 5 million American college students.

The ready-made audience that gave Facebook its start is proving a fertile hunting ground for the company that is hoping to crack the $US7.65 billion ($A8.5 billion) US mobile advertising market.

It's not a small challenge, given it will be competing with Google and Facebook for the dollars, but it is the first stage of a plan to list on Nasdaq, according to chief executive officer and founder Ian Rodwell.

For more information on the ACS Week In Review contact

Thomas Shanahan

0449 902 130